We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir

We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir

How do you find yourself when the world tells you that you don't exist?

Samra Habib has spent most of her life searching for the safety to be herself. As an Ahmadi Muslim growing up in Pakistan, she faced regular threats from Islamic extremists who believed the small, dynamic sect to be blasphemous. From her parents, she internalized the lesson that revealing her identity could put her in grave danger.

When her family came to Canada as refugees, Samra encountered a whole new host of challenges: bullies, racism, the threat of poverty, and an arranged marriage. Backed into a corner, her need for a safe space--in which to grow and nurture her creative, feminist spirit--became dire. The men in her life wanted to police her, the women in her life had only shown her the example of pious obedience, and her body was a problem to be solved.

So begins an exploration of faith, art, love, and queer sexuality, a journey that takes her to the far reaches of the globe to uncover a truth that was within her all along. A triumphant memoir of forgiveness and family, both chosen and not, We Have Always Been Here is a rallying cry for anyone who has ever felt out of place and a testament to the power of fearlessly inhabiting one's truest self.

Title:We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir
ISBN:null
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    We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir Reviews

  • CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    An amazing memoir. Habib recounts her childhood as an Ahmadi Muslim in Pakistan, where her family had to hide to stay safe in the face of Islamic extremists and then how this pattern of hiding combine...

  • Basma

    I have been a fan of Samra Habib's work since a few years back. I think I first stumbled upon her writing in The Guardian and later found myself on tumblr looking at her photo projects. So you can say...

  • Meena Khan

    This book is very misleading if you are interested in learning about Islam. Please don't use this book as your reference point. For example, when the writer describes the differences between Shia and ...

  • Marie-Therese

    3.5 stars overall, although the first third of the book is considerably stronger, fresher, and more interesting than the rest....

  • Ameema Saeed

    4.5 stars....

  • Susan

    While I enjoyed learning about Ms. Habib and would love to see her photography, I would not say this book was much of an exploration as stated in the summary. For despite being presented as a memoir, ...

  • Laurie ? The Baking Bookworm

    4.5 STARS - This is an honest and revealing coming-of-age memoir of a queer Muslim woman's struggle with identity, faith and family. Beginning with her childhood as a young Ahmadi Muslim in Pakistan a...

  • Ann

    There were moments during this book that I felt a little bit nervous (like any time the author mentioned trans people), but overall this was a beautiful portrayal of self-discovery. I have read a lot ...

  • Jessica

    I managed to misinterpret the description of this to such an extent that I spent the first half of the book wondering when the author was going to start talking about queerness. But her narrative of h...

  • Fully.Booked

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5! - I’m the first to admit that 9 times out of 10, I’ll choose fiction over nonfiction🙋🏼♀ Memoirs can be tricky but I fell in love with this one! I was initially drawn to ...