Slave Religion: The

Slave Religion: The "invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South

Twenty-five years after its original publication, Slave Religion remains a classic in the study of African American history and religion. In a new chapter in this anniversary edition, author Albert J. Raboteau reflects upon the origins of the book, the reactions to it over the past twenty-five years, and how he would write it differently today. Using a variety of first and second-hand sources-- some objective, some personal, all riveting-- Raboteau analyzes the transformation of the African religions into evangelical Christianity. He presents the narratives of the slaves themselves, as well as missionary reports, travel accounts, folklore, black autobiographies, and the journals of white observers to describe the day-to-day religious life in the slave communities. Slave Religion is a must-read for anyone wanting a full picture of this "invisible institution."

Title:Slave Religion: The "invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780195174120
Format Type:

    Slave Religion: The "invisible Institution" in the Antebellum South Reviews

  • Jamie Howison

    This is something of a classic in the literature on the slave church. It started out as a doctoral thesis, but unlike some books that have that provenance, this one really engages. Sure, there is an i...

  • Fred Kohn

    I found this a very interesting read although dense in some places. Especially useful are the copious quotes from slaves, former slaves, and free blacks....

  • Seth Pierce

    While providing an excellent overview of the religious practices of American slaves, I thought the author repeated himself a lot. I would have liked more emphasis on the folk religion of Africa and mo...

  • Drick

    This book is based on Albert Raboteau's doctoral dissertation in the 1970's and updated. Using actual transcripts of former slaves' description of their religious experience, he shows how the Africani...

  • Derek Brown

    Well researched (obviously) and important as part of the, at the time, burgeoning African studies movement. Perhaps ahead of its time in its treatment of the role of the oppressed in the history of th...

  • Josiah

    How did religious life among slaves develop, and against what obstacles? What was the nature of this religious life? What type of effect did it have on their character, views of slavery, desire for fr...

  • Maxine Bolden

    Very insightful and inspirational writingInspiring stories and testimonies, not just theory and intellect but heart and soul stories that lend credence to our historical understanding of slave religio...

  • Christina

    This book should be required reading for all Americans, and it should be doubly required for any American who claims to be a Christian....

  • Garret Shields

    4.5/5 - The most interesting book I’ve read so far in my American Religious History class. Impressive use of sources, and amazing look into the religious experience of slaves, primarily in the USA.D...

  • Susie  Meister

    The strength of Raboteau's book for my purposes is its discussion on how slaves became familiarized with Christianity. Unlike many narratives, Raboteau's claims most of the slaves learned of the tradi...